Breaking News – Tempo Visuel http://www.tempo-visuel.com/ Tue, 24 May 2022 18:00:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.tempo-visuel.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/tempovisuel-icon-70x70.png Breaking News – Tempo Visuel http://www.tempo-visuel.com/ 32 32 Johnny Depp vs. Amber Heard trial live: breaking news and updates today, May 24 https://www.tempo-visuel.com/johnny-depp-vs-amber-heard-trial-live-breaking-news-and-updates-today-may-24/ Tue, 24 May 2022 17:50:52 +0000 https://www.tempo-visuel.com/johnny-depp-vs-amber-heard-trial-live-breaking-news-and-updates-today-may-24/

Depp vs Heard: some of the key points from the start of the trial

If you’ve just touched on the Depp-Heard case, here’s a selection of some of the key points from the start of the trial that will help bring you up to speed:

— Depp said he never hit Heard or any other woman. He said it was her who got violent and ‘bullied’ him with ‘degrading name-calling’. “It felt like pure hate towards me,” Depp said. “If I stayed to argue, eventually, I was sure it would escalate into violence, and often it did.”

– During an argument in Australia in early 2015, Depp said Heard threw a bottle of vodka that cut the top of his right middle finger. The actor said he was in shock and wrote messages to Heard on the wall using blood from his finger. Heard offered a different account, sobbing as she told the jury that Depp had sexually assaulted her that night by inserting a bottle of alcohol into her vagina. “I was scared,” she said. “I had just married her.”

– A few months later, Heard said, Depp broke his nose and tore chunks of his hair out in another violent encounter.

– Lawyers for Heard presented photos they said showed injuries from various arguments, including scars on her arm that were visible as she posed on a red carpet, and redness and swelling around an eye that she said had been hit by a phone thrown by Depp. Depp’s lawyers showed footage of public appearances they said was taken at the time of their fights and appeared to show no injuries.

— Depp testified that feces was found in the couple’s bed in 2016. One of his security guards said Heard told him it was “an awful prank gone wrong.” Heard denied any involvement and suggested one of the couple’s dogs was responsible.

— Heard said Depp first became physically violent when he slapped her after she laughed at a tattoo that read “Wino Forever”. The tattoo previously read “Winona Forever”, referencing Depp’s former girlfriend, Winona Ryder.

– The jurors heard an audio clip of Depp threatening to cut himself with a knife during one of their last in-person meetings. “That’s psychologically, emotionally where I was,” Depp said. “In the end, I was broken…I thought the only answer was here, take my blood, that’s all I have left.”

– Heard’s lawyers introduced text messages in which Depp called Heard a “dirty whore” and said he wanted her dead. Writing to actor Paul Bettany in 2013, Depp said, “Let’s drown her before we burn her” and “I’ll fuck her burnt corpse afterwards to make sure she’s dead.”

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Spain experiences record heat wave in May https://www.tempo-visuel.com/spain-experiences-record-heat-wave-in-may/ Sun, 22 May 2022 16:15:16 +0000 https://www.tempo-visuel.com/spain-experiences-record-heat-wave-in-may/

By Alex Hardie, CNN and Reuters

Parts of Spain experienced a record heat wave for the month of May as temperatures reached 40.3 degrees Celsius (104.5 degrees Fahrenheit) in one city, according to the country’s national weather agency AEMET.

By Sunday afternoon, the meteorological agency had issued high temperature warnings in 17 Spanish regions.

According to Reuters, residents in the country’s south “waving from fans, drank water and doused themselves with fountains” on Saturday as the heatwave swept through the region.

On Friday, the city of Jaén in Andalusia, southern Spain, recorded a temperature of 40.3 degrees Celsius.

In a tweet, the Spanish meteorological agency said that in the case of Jaén, temperatures were up to 16 degrees Celsius (60.8 degrees Fahrenheit) above average for the time of year.

Across the rest of the peninsula, temperatures were at least 7 degrees Celsius (44.6 degrees Fahrenheit) above the normal average, the agency added.

AEMET spokesperson Ruben del Campo said: “This episode is very unusual for mid-May and could be one of the most intense episodes of the past 20 years.”

The early hours of Saturday morning were “extraordinarily hot” for the time of year in much of central and southern Spain, according to AEMET.

In many places, early morning temperatures did not drop below 25 degrees Celsius (77 degrees Fahrenheit) – which the weather agency said “is virtually unheard of on the peninsula in May”.

AEMET also said the city of Segovia experienced its first-ever “tropical night” in May, defined as a night when temperatures do not drop below 20 degrees Celsius (68 degrees Fahrenheit).

Several countries around the world have recently experienced major heat waves, including India and Pakistan, as well as parts of the United States, such as the drought-stricken plains and Texas, as temperatures hit 90 degrees. Fahrenheit this month.

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]]> Johnny Depp vs. Amber Heard trial: Breaking news for today, May 20 https://www.tempo-visuel.com/johnny-depp-vs-amber-heard-trial-breaking-news-for-today-may-20/ Sat, 21 May 2022 01:49:17 +0000 https://www.tempo-visuel.com/johnny-depp-vs-amber-heard-trial-breaking-news-for-today-may-20/

Depp lawyers aim to discredit Heard

On Tuesday this week, Johnny Depp’s lawyers attempted to discredit Amber Heard’s abuse allegations during the former couple’s defamation trial on Tuesday, presenting a knife she gave the star of “Pirates of the Caribbean” and loving notes she wrote to him.

Early in the day’s proceedings, attorney Camille Vasquez asked jurors to examine the knife Heard purchased for Depp in 2012. Heard, best known for her role in “Aquaman,” testified that Depp had already become violent towards her at that time.

“Is that the knife you gave to the man who would get drunk and violent towards you?” asked the lawyer. “It’s the knife I gave him as a present, yes,” she said, adding that she didn’t think he would stab her with it.

Depp, 58, is suing Heard for $50 million, claiming she defamed him when she claimed to have been the victim of domestic violence. Heard, 36, countersued for $100 million, arguing that Depp smeared him by calling her a liar.

Depp testified that he never hit Heard and maintained that she was the aggressor in their relationship. He said she threw a bottle of vodka at him in early 2015, cutting the top of his right middle finger.

Heard said she did not cause the finger injury and only hit it to defend herself or her sister.

Tuesday, Depp’s attorney read diary entries which Heard said the couple continued to share love notes.

“True love isn’t just about the madness of passion or the security of peace. No, it’s about both,” Heard wrote in May 2015, two months after Depp’s finger injury.

“I still want, perhaps more than ever, to tear you apart, devour you and savor the taste.” she added.

In another excerpt after their July 2015 honeymoon aboard the Orient Express train, Heard said she “couldn’t imagine a more magnificent honeymoon” and added, “I love you more and more each passing day”.

Heard told jurors on Monday that Depp assaulted her and wrapped a T-shirt around her neck during the trip. A month later, Heard wrote that Depp was “my cornerstone, my heart, my everything.”

“You are my life. I hate it when we argue. I hate hurting you. I love you more than anything.” she wrote.

Asked about the nominations, Heard said she tried to “nurture as much peace as possible” and that “when things were going well, they were really good”.

The actors tied the knot in February 2015, and their divorce was finalized about two years later.

Oral arguments are scheduled for May 27.

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Climate change makes record heat waves in India and Pakistan 100 times more likely https://www.tempo-visuel.com/climate-change-makes-record-heat-waves-in-india-and-pakistan-100-times-more-likely/ Wed, 18 May 2022 12:21:22 +0000 https://www.tempo-visuel.com/climate-change-makes-record-heat-waves-in-india-and-pakistan-100-times-more-likely/

By Lianne Kolirin, CNN

Climate change has made a record heatwave hitting northwest India and Pakistan 100 times more likely, scientists said on Wednesday, as both countries experience high temperatures that disrupt daily life.

In an analysis, climatologists from the UK’s Met Office found that the natural probability of a heat wave exceeding 2010 average temperatures would be once in 312 years, but when climate change is taken into account , the odds increase to once every 3.1 years.

April and May 2010 were used as a point of comparison because these months had the highest average temperatures since 1900.

Soaring temperatures in parts of Pakistan and India in recent weeks have forced schools to close, damaged crops, put pressure on energy supplies and kept residents indoors. It has even prompted experts to question whether such heat is suitable for human survival.

Jacobabad, one of the hottest cities in the world, in Pakistan’s Sindh province, hit 51 degrees Celsius (123.8F) on Sunday and 50C (122F) the day before. In neighboring India, temperatures in the capital region, Delhi, topped 49C (120F) on Sunday.

The analysis also made projections, showing that the frequency of these heat waves in the region would increase to once every 1.15 years by the end of the century.

“Hot spells have always been a feature of the region’s pre-monsoon climate in April and May. However, our study shows that climate change is driving the heat intensity of these periods, making record high temperatures 100 times more likely,” said Nikos Christidis of the Met Office, who produced the analysis. “By the end of the century, increasing climate change will likely result in temperatures of these values ​​on average each year.”

India and Pakistan are highly vulnerable to the impacts of the climate crisis, especially in terms of extreme heat.

The IPCC’s Chandni Singh said earlier this month that there was a limit to how well humans could adapt to such heat, adding that the heat wave was “testing the limits of survivability. human”.

Scientists said a new temperature record was likely reached in the region during the recent heat wave.

Temperatures in the subcontinent have dropped slightly in recent days, but the respite is expected to be short-lived, according to Paul Hutcheon of the Met Office’s Global Guidance Unit.

“The heat looks likely to build up again from the middle of the week, peaking later in the week or over the weekend, with highs likely to reach 50C again in some places, with overnight temperatures very high,” he said on the Met. Agency website.

“Over the weekend, temperatures are expected to drop further closer to average. There is also a continued increased risk of fires (largely due to planned agricultural burns) in the region, which would further exacerbate the poor air quality Some strong winds will occasionally raise dust plumes.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2022 Cable News Network, Inc., a WarnerMedia company. All rights reserved.

CNN’s Helen Regan, Rhea Mogul, Sophia Saifi, Asim Khan and Esha Mitra contributed to this report.

]]> Catalytic Converter Thefts Continue in Region – Medford News, Weather, Sports, Breaking News https://www.tempo-visuel.com/catalytic-converter-thefts-continue-in-region-medford-news-weather-sports-breaking-news/ Mon, 16 May 2022 13:00:02 +0000 https://www.tempo-visuel.com/catalytic-converter-thefts-continue-in-region-medford-news-weather-sports-breaking-news/

Area school district hit twice in about a month

While thefts of catalytic converters from automobiles continue to increase nationally, a local increase recently affected the Phoenix-Talent School District.

Someone stole five catalytic converters from three school buses used to transport special education students to and from their school campuses. A sixth converter was destroyed. It was partially cut but left behind.

Buses require more than one catalytic converter. Thus, each vehicle can adequately reduce the toxins emitted by gasoline vehicles.

Hybrid vehicles also have this type of equipment.

The Jackson County Sheriff’s Office reported the theft occurred at the Talent bus station between late afternoon May 6 and early morning May 9. The buses were parked in front of a building there.

The failure of buses to arrive as scheduled Monday morning has made life more difficult for special education students and their families, Superintendent of Schools Brent Barry said.

Staff quickly began contacting the students’ families to let them know the bus would not be arriving. Just as quickly, parents had to find a way to get their children to school, if possible. Many of them also had to find a way to get to work on time, he explained.

“It wasn’t a great start to the week,” Barry said.

First Student Inc. provides transportation and leases the district court.

The contractor was able to bring in replacement buses from Grants Pass, Central Point and Roseburg school districts to help Phoenix-Talent deal with the sudden loss. These vehicles arrived the same afternoon. For this quick response to the district’s needs, Barry said he was grateful to everyone involved.

This was the second flight of catalytic converters in about a month from the location. Catalytic converters were removed from two more buses on April 7. Thieves cut a wire fence to gain access to vehicles parked in the yard, the sheriff’s office said.

Security cameras and lighting are being upgraded on site.

Due to ongoing supply issues, expensive parts won’t be easily replaced, Barry said.

Area law enforcement said there had been other such thefts in the area.

Both Oregon and Washington have passed legislation designed to deter such thefts by focusing on scrapping and destroying automobiles.

Oregon Senate Bill 803 went into effect Jan. 1 and limits which recyclers can buy them as well as who can sell them.

The Washington House Bill 1815 became law on March 30. It sets requirements for companies that would accept catalytic converters, provides grants to local law enforcement agencies for undercover operations, and creates a task force to examine how the state can address the problem at the coming.

“It’s a crisis,” said Kenton Brine, chairman of the NW Insurance Council.

The council is an insurance industry-supported nonprofit organization that provides information about insurance issues in Oregon, Washington, and Idaho.

Brine described it as an evolving problem that people in government and industry are still trying to find solutions for. “Oregon and Washington are off to a good start,” he added.

Large parking lots are prime locations for such crimes, as are businesses with work vehicles as well as many vehicles parked on the street and in driveways.

Organized theft rings can round up trucks loaded with these parts and quickly take them to other parts of the world, Brine said.

Thieves might consider the Medford area a good place for this activity as it is near the California border.

That might not be a benefit for much longer, as the California state legislature may reconsider Senate Bill 919 after it failed to pass through a Senate committee in late April.

The current version of the bill requires devices to be permanently marked with the original vehicle identification number, has requirements for recyclers and penalties for violating those rules.

Some newer vehicle models are designed with catalytic converters located in a location underneath which makes them difficult to reach and can be a deterrent.

Brine and local law enforcement officials suggest people do what is possible to protect their vehicles.

Vehicle owners are advised to consult their car dealership or mechanic to determine which deterrent might work for that make and model.

Methods to make catalytic converters less attractive to thieves include engraving identification numbers on the device, affixing a plate to protect the connection to the operating system, or marking so that precious metals from these devices – platinum, palladium and rhodium – are not recyclable.

Among Aaron Lewis’s suggestions from the sheriff’s office is to make sure a vehicle is parked in a well-lit area and, if possible, in view of a video camera.

Residents lucky enough to have a garage should use it to secure their vehicles, said Medford Police Lt. Mike Budreau.

Contact reporter Terri Harber at tharber@rosebudmedia.com or 541-776-4468.

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Boston police ID man who was shot and killed after stabbing an officer https://www.tempo-visuel.com/boston-police-id-man-who-was-shot-and-killed-after-stabbing-an-officer/ Sat, 14 May 2022 20:30:00 +0000 https://www.tempo-visuel.com/boston-police-id-man-who-was-shot-and-killed-after-stabbing-an-officer/ Boston police have identified the Massachusetts man who was fatally shot by an officer after stabbing another in the chest. Boston police say Richard Ortiz, 48, of Revere, came at an officer with a knife and a second officer then opened fire, killing the man. “Officers encountered a man wielding a knife,” Boston Police Superintendent Gregory Long said. “During this encounter, he stabbed one of the responding officers in the upper torso. Another officer who was at the scene discharged his weapon.” Long said the suspect was pronounced dead at the scene. Suffolk County District Attorney Kevin Hayden was on scene investigating the incident. A high-level source within the Boston Police Department told 5 Investigates’ Kathy Curran that Ortiz was known to police. The source said Ortiz has a lengthy criminal record, including an active warrant for breaking into the home where he was shot. The district attorney’s office said the Boston police officer who was stabbed suffered serious injuries that are not considered life-threatening. A source told Curran that the officer’s life was likely saved by his vest, which prevented him from sustaining life-threatening injuries. The source also said the injured officer was lucky to have a second officer on the scene as Ortiz was standing over him with a knife. Witnesses described hearing four or five gunshots, then a woman moaning.

Boston police have identified the Massachusetts man who was shot by an officer after stabbing another in the chest.

The incident happened around 3 a.m. Saturday in the area of ​​22 Glendale St. near Hancock Street in Boston’s Upham’s Corners neighborhood.

Boston police say Richard Ortiz, 48, of Revere, came at an officer with a knife and a second officer then opened fire, killing the man.

“Officers encountered a man wielding a knife,” Boston Police Superintendent Gregory Long said. “During this encounter, he stabbed one of the responding officers in the upper torso. Another officer who was at the scene discharged his weapon.”

Long said the suspect was pronounced dead at the scene.

Suffolk County District Attorney Kevin Hayden was on scene investigating the incident.

This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, on their website.

A high-level source within the Boston Police Department told 5 Investigates’ Kathy Curran that Ortiz was known to police. The source said Ortiz has a lengthy criminal record, including an active warrant for breaking into the home where he was shot.

The district attorney’s office said the Boston police officer who was stabbed suffered serious injuries that are not considered life-threatening.

The source told Curran that the officer’s life was likely saved by his vest, which prevented him from sustaining life-threatening injuries. The source also said the injured officer was lucky to have a second officer on the scene as Ortiz was standing over him with a knife.

Witnesses described hearing four or five gunshots, then a woman moaning.

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Large fire reported at Indiana County sawmill https://www.tempo-visuel.com/large-fire-reported-at-indiana-county-sawmill/ Thu, 12 May 2022 20:35:00 +0000 https://www.tempo-visuel.com/large-fire-reported-at-indiana-county-sawmill/ OK.

Large fire reported at Indiana County sawmill

A sawmill has caught fire in Indiana County, Pittsburgh’s Action News 4 has learned. The fire is occurring at 1274 Brush Creek Road in Homer City. At least 10 fire departments help put out the fire. No injuries were reported. Watch the SKY 4 video in the video player above This is a story in development. Stay with Action News 4 from Pittsburgh for updates. Download the WTAE mobile app to stay connected with the latest news.

A sawmill has caught fire in Indiana County, Pittsburgh’s Action News 4 has learned.

The fire is occurring at 1274 Brush Creek Road in Homer City. At least 10 fire departments help put out the fire. No injuries were reported.

Watch the video of SKY 4 in the video player above

This is a developing story. Stay with Action News 4 from Pittsburgh for updates. Download the WTAE mobile app to stay connected with the latest news.

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SOFTBALL / BASEBALL: North slips by GP – Medford News, Weather, Sports, Breaking News https://www.tempo-visuel.com/softball-baseball-north-slips-by-gp-medford-news-weather-sports-breaking-news/ Wed, 11 May 2022 05:29:00 +0000 https://www.tempo-visuel.com/softball-baseball-north-slips-by-gp-medford-news-weather-sports-breaking-news/

For North Medford, Tuesday’s euphoric feeling at the end of a softball game seemed to take a while, and for good reason.

It’s been a month since the Black Tornado returned the key to batting to complete a competitive battle, but they were scattered throughout in a decisive 8-7 win over visiting Grants Pass in North Medford High.

“We finally came out the other side of a one-point game for a change,” North Medford coach Chris Campbell said of a mixture of joy and further relief. “It was really good to see.”

The pinnacle of the Southwest Conference victory, which ended a five-game losing streak for the Black Tornado (10-13, 4-9 SWC), came from an appropriate source in the hitter n °9 Anna Gates. The senior second baseman had already reached base twice on hard-hit balls to shortstop, which led to errors and ultimately led to her scoring a pair of runs for North.

Given another chance to help her team stem their fall in the bottom of the seventh, Gates proved herself up to the challenge.

Alexis Wadley, lined up in the fourth inning, singled to open the seventh and qualified for second base when rookie Caileigh Raines walked one out. After a wild pitch from Grants Pass senior Sarah Martin that put the runners in second and third, the Cavers (10-14, 6-7) opted to intentionally step on freshman rookie Kayleigh Brousseau to put set up a force play at any base.

With all eyes on her, Gates delivered a hot shot to third baseman Ellie Berg, whose home throw was high and too late to deny a hard-charging Wadley.

“Anna worked hard this week on her swing and put the ball in play without trying to overdo it,” said Campbell, whose team had already lost two one-point games against GP. “They had the infield and Anna hit a good hard shot at third baseman and she kinda missed it. (Wadley) broke really well on the ball and is a fast runner, and she really went hard in the plate for us. She saw the ball drop and took off and did a really good job getting home.

The clutch efforts sparked a long-awaited celebration for North Medford, which beat last-place South Eugene on April 26 but had otherwise gone 0-for-9 since an April 9 sweep at Roseburg.

“It was just a good, solid team effort,” Campbell said, “and it just showed the girls what they can do if we put on a full game. Their abilities will take them far if they just believe in themselves and compete on all terrains.

That belief was challenged early on as Grants Pass built a 7-2 advantage early in the fourth set, but Campbell said his team’s determination was capable of winning and the Tornado were rewarded in of a crucial fifth-inning flurry.

“The girls just didn’t give up,” Campbell said. “We lost 7-2 and we kept talking about ‘Chip away, chip away. We don’t need all of them, just one or two, whatever we can get to put the pressure back on and start building momentum to see if we can’t come back and get the win.

After Gates and Rhyan Hamlin each safely reached Cavers errors, Samara Miles scored home the first innings from the frame and Hamlin then scored on a passed ball. With one out, Alyssa Hartzheim singled for her third RBI of the game. Wadley followed with her first hit after being slotted into the lineup, and junior Araseli Guerrero ripped up a two-run triple that ended in another home plate play beaten by Wadley.

“We tried to find kids who want to compete and Araseli stepped up last week against Sheldon, so we gave her another chance today,” Campbell said of the rarely used designated forward. “Hitting is contagious and by then a few girls had been hitting and she just followed suit with what the others were doing.”

Miles went 3-for-4 and North had two hits apiece from Hartzheim and Wadley, while Gabbi Urban came on as relief from Hartzheim to claim the pitching victory with a four-inning effort that included scoreless frames over the course of the last three rounds.

Grants Pass1042000—7104

North Medford0020501—892

Martin and Harry; Hartzheim, Urban (4) and Brousseau. W — Urban. L-Martin. 3B – NM: Guerrero.

ROSEBURG 3, MEDFORD SOUTH 0: In Roseburg, Kirsten Morgan and Maleyah Thoele generated the only hits for South Medford as the third-ranked Panthers took a half-game lead in the Southwest Conference with the loss on the road.

Kami Gibson struck out seven and scored one on two hits for Roseburg (11-12, 7-6 SWC), who scored twice late in the first inning to take control of a two-run brace by Haleigh Wamboldt.

South Medford (20-4, 11-2) ran out of runners on second and third in the third after a two-out rally, and had a similar setup in the seventh after Maddy Fullenwider and Nicole Ledendecker reached base with a takedown before Gibson escaped. the final jam with a groundout and a strikeout.

South Medford0000000—022

Roseburg200010x—351

Hudson, Knutson (5) and Hillyer; Gibson and Stribling. W-Gibson. L—Hudson. 2B—R: Blix, Wamboldt.

CRATER 10-9, EAGLE POINT 0-10: At Eagle Point, Alexis Perez threw a three-hitter shutout and Abby Foster broke a solo home run on Crater’s five-run third inning in Game 1 to help the Comets clinch the Premier League title. Midwest.

Eagle Point managed to salvage a double split and tied for second with Thurston with two games remaining.

The Comets (18-6, 13-1 MWL) won Game 1 in five innings under the 10-run leniency rule. At the last drink, Eagle Point (16-8, 10-4) rallied in the sixth to win.

Perez allowed five hits with two walks and two strikeouts in Game 1, and Lilli Reid hit a two-run single to extend the Comets’ lead to 7-0 in Game 3. She went 2 for 3 with three RBIs, Alyssa Kilbane went 3 for 3 and Kaylynn Wolchok was 2 for 3 and scored twice.

After a one-out single from Baylee Mullen of the Eagles brought Jocelyn Hanan home to tie the score at 9 in Game 2, Jovianna Marshall picked Hailey Waldon for the go-ahead in the bottom of the sixth. Hanan had reached base with a first walk and advanced on a brace from Waldon.

Eagle Point’s Sydney Boren hit a solo homer in the first inning and went 2-for-4 with two RBIs, while Mullen and Marshall each went 2-for-3.

Kilbane went 4-for-5 with two runs and an RBI for Crater, while Abby Foster was 3-for-4 with three RBIs and Maddie Sheadel went 2-for-4 with two runs and an RBI.

FIRST GAME

Crater21520—10122

Eagle Stitch00000—053

Perez and Reid; Smith and Nielsen. W — Perez (7-3). L-Smith. 2B — EP: Boren. HR-C: A. Foster.

SECOND GAME

Crater0053100—9143

Eagle Stitch140032x—10113

Allen, S. Foster (2), and Reid; Smith, Lierman (5) and Nielsen. W—Lierman. L—S. Foster. 2B-C: Kilbane, Van Wey; EP: Waldon. HR-PE: Boren (6).

Baseball

MEDFORD SOUTH 6, ROSEBURG 1: At Roseburg, South Medford used a five-run fifth inning to open the Southwest Conference game and lift the seventh-placed Panthers even to the top of the league standings with No. 10 Roseburg at 10 -3 each.

Tosh Stupenhaus and Cameron Sewell opened the fifth with singles and Jace Miller followed with an RBI double. Three-walked Tanner Douglas kept the scoreboard moving with a triple RBI and back-to-back singles from Elijah Havey and Carson Joe gave the Panthers plenty of cushion (18-3).

Joe allowed three hits with four strikeouts and two walks in an all-game effort for South, which also saw Cameron Sewell go 3-for-4 against the Indians (16-7).

South of Medford0000510—690

Roseburg0010000—131

Joe and Havey; Corbin, P. Burke (6) and Knox. W-Joe. L-Corbin. 2B—SM: Miller; A: Hubbard, Dunn. 3B-SM: Douglas.

SUBSIDIES PASS 12, NORTH MEDFORD 6: North Medford gave up five runs in the top of the second set and could never recover as Grants Pass triumphed in the Southwest Conference contest.

Taholo Vainuku-Johnson hit a two-run homer in the big second inning for the Cavemen (12-11, 6-7 SWC) and added a two-run single in the fifth to extend their lead to 10-3. The senior went 3-for-5 with five RBIs and two runs scored, with Luke Morgan also going 3-for-5 with four runs scored.

Trey Newmann and Colton Morgan had each scored singles runs in the first and seventh innings, respectively, for the Black Tornado (10-12, 4-7). Newmann, Morgan and Johnny King all had two hits, and Davis Carr drove in two runs.

Grants Pass3500202—12141

North Medford3000012—673

Baker, Osborne (7) and Osborne, Carnes (7); King, Carr (3), Havens (7) and Newberg. W — Baker. L- King. 2B — GP: Baker. HR – GP: Johnson.

ST. MARY’S 5, CHRISTIAN WATERFALL 2: Alan Gomez’s two-run single in the bottom of the sixth broke a 2-run deadlock and No. 9 St. Mary’s beat top-ranked rival Crosstown and Cascade Christian to open the key three-game series of this week.

St. Mary’s (13-6, 6-4 FWL) scored four runs to regain the lead after Cascade Christian (18-4, 8-3) took a 2-1 lead in the top of the sixth on a Liam single Benade RBI. Ean Lawrence, who doubled to start the rally, scored the tying run on a wild pitch before Gomez put the Crusaders in front with a single down the right field line. Gomez scored the last run of the inning on a Cascade pitch error.

The Challengers previously tied the game at fifth on Jack Knips’ single.

Three St. Mary’s pitchers – Beau Aldrich, Travis Johnson and Eli Haynes – limited Cascade Christian to just four hits. Aldrich allowed one hit and retired four of four shutout innings, while Johnson pitched 2 2/3 innings, allowing an unearned run and three hits with four strikeouts. Haynes, who also had a pair of hits and a key catch in the outfield, came in and saved the endgame to get the save.

Waterfall Christian0000110—241

St. Mary’s100004x—573

Thompson, Stofflet (6) and Wallace; Aldrich, Johnson (5), Haynes (7) and Lawrence. W-Johnson. L-Thompson. S- Haynes. 2B — SM: Laurent.

Andy Atkinson/Mail TribuneAlexis Wadley of North Medford slides safely into home plate to tie the game in the fifth inning on Tuesday.

Andy Atkinson / Mail TribuneEmily Dunn of North Medford reaches to make a catch for an out during the fourth inning.

Andy Atkinson/Mail TribuneAraseli Guerrero of North Medford connects for an RBI triple in the fifth round against Grants Pass.

Andy Atkinson / Mail TribuneNorth Medford’s Alyssa Hartzheim makes the catch for an out at third base in the fourth inning.

Andy Atkinson / Mail TribuneAlexis Wadley of North Medford falls to the plate to score the winning run late in the seventh inning against Grants Pass.

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SOU and RCC discuss ‘higher education landscape’ – Medford News, Weather, Sports, Breaking News https://www.tempo-visuel.com/sou-and-rcc-discuss-higher-education-landscape-medford-news-weather-sports-breaking-news/ Mon, 09 May 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://www.tempo-visuel.com/sou-and-rcc-discuss-higher-education-landscape-medford-news-weather-sports-breaking-news/

File photo Education professionals from diverse backgrounds discussed the current needs and strengths of local institutions at a May 2 conference in Medford.

School and industry professionals come together for focus groups, one-on-one discussions

Representatives from Rogue Community College, Southern Oregon University, and the Oregon Institute of Technology met last week with members of the community to discuss “the challenges and successes of higher education.”

The conversations, derived in part from a team of researchers from the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS), will be used, according to a press release, to form a “comprehensive map of the education landscape higher” to help everyone from legislators to post-secondary learning consultants make decisions about “effective future planning and pathways”.

These details come from a statement from the RCC, which announced the May 2 meeting, which was held at the SOU/RCC Higher Education Center. The event was “a research study conducted by state organizations,” according to Julie Raefield, public information officer for the RCC.

In the statement, RCC President Cathy Kemper-Pelle called the meeting “an exceptional opportunity to discuss the intersections of education, employment and student challenges.”

“This forum explored meaningful topics for planning, legislative advocacy and local action,” she said. “I really appreciate the broad participation of all voters in this important dialogue.”

This dialogue took place in two ways. One was via NCHEMS researchers, who “asked in-depth questions” to event attendees about “ongoing higher education efforts” at RCC, SOU and OIT.

After that, roundtables were held regarding changes in regional economies and “what changes need to be made in higher education to cope with these changes,” according to the statement.

Brian Prescott, vice president of NCHEMS, said what his organization has done in Medford is tied to what it is doing across Oregon, gathering feedback from multiple groups related to how public post-secondary education is organized, financed and otherwise operated to meet the needs of the State. and student needs and reduce equity.

“We intentionally traveled the state to try to better appreciate regional differences so that everything that happens reflects those differences,” Prescott wrote in an email.

SOU President Rick Bailey, who is a newcomer to the state and has only been in office since January, supported the effort.

“In my opinion and from my experience in higher education, I can say with confidence that every good thing and every success we have had has come because we partnered with someone else,” said Bailey said. “For me, to all the challenges and things that we all face, the answer has to be collaboration.”

The new SOU President says he has learned as much from listening to his higher education counterparts as from NCHEMS representatives

“The takeaway for me…is that there is real opportunity in the way we as institutions communicate with prospective students, especially those who are underrepresented in higher education – and that involves a careful exploration of the current bureaucracy that exists between stakeholders,” Bailey said. . “When we can navigate that – and even change it – in ways that improve communication, we can do amazing things together.”

Representatives of regional social service organizations and K-12 superintendents, such as Brent Champion of Medford, attended and spoke at the conference.

“I strongly believe our systems are stronger when we’re aligned together, and so I wanted to offer my voice and support,” Champion said. “We are always looking for ways to strengthen our partnerships in the Valley.”

Champion noted that the RCC, SOU, OIT event was different from most conferences he has attended, particularly because it had a panel discussion component, which he participated in.

“People in the focus group just talked about the specific needs of our community. We need diesel mechanics; we need surgical technicians; we need nurses; a need for teachers – there were no surprises in that,” the superintendent said. “It’s something we’ve been working on as a community for some time.”

Champion shared with the focus group that students who take dual-enrollment courses in high school who aren’t guaranteed to be recognized throughout Oregon because colleges in the state may have numbers different courses for some courses.

“It doesn’t fit and makes it more complicated,” Champion said. “I’m using this as a very simple example that if we can align these things, how much more powerful it will be for our students to make choices across the state.”

“I always appreciate the needs of the community – it’s essential for us in the Medford School District,” Champion said. “The good news is that we have our ears to the ground on a regular basis, so there have been no surprises. Still, that’s good to know.”

Representatives and CEOs from industries ranging from regional healthcare to manufacturing were among the more than 100 attendees in attendance.

Contact journalist Kevin Opsahl at 541-776-4476 or kopsahl@rosebudmedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @KevJourno.

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Media misses major questions in quest for ‘breaking news’ https://www.tempo-visuel.com/media-misses-major-questions-in-quest-for-breaking-news/ Sat, 07 May 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://www.tempo-visuel.com/media-misses-major-questions-in-quest-for-breaking-news/

The BDN Opinion section operates independently and does not set newsroom policies or contribute to the writing or editing of articles elsewhere in the newspaper or on bangordailynews.com.

“All the news that is worth printing.”

It is the historic motto of the New York Times. But the media often miss “all the information” and are selective due to their limited resources or their own biases. Perhaps the press rushes too hard to beat the competition; not everything is “breaking news“.

Here are some questions the media could have answered.